There for all freshman athletes. On top of

There is debate on whether college student athletes
should be paid. Here’s a look at each side, and why student athletes should,
without a doubt, receive some type of salary. Many people think college student-athletes should be paid. Many
students who are receiving scholarship money struggle financially and some
can’t afford to eat and pay for gas, basic living necessities. University athletic
programs use student athlete’s names and pictures to promote their program; this
alone is a good reason to pay athletes. The NCAA argues that they provide scholarships as a form of payment for students and their athletic
capabilities. Being a college student athlete is easily comparable to working a
fulltime job. Student athletes are required to spend a lot of their time participating
in team lifts in the weight room, practicing on the court or field, learning in
class room, and taking part in other athletic meetings. Many student athletes
are even required to meet a certain amount of study hall hours per week; this
being mandatory for all freshman athletes. On top of missing class on numerous
days per semester because of games, they compete in games that are televised
and bring in money for the university.

Since student-athletes also bring in
revenue for their team and college or university, especially in games of big
attendance. Those who argue in favor of paying athletes say the students should
receive a portion of the profits. College
football and men’s basketball teams bring in far more revenue than any other
athletic programs, so these athletes would likely earn more than those of other
sports, such as baseball, soccer, volleyball, softball and golf.  In this article “The NCAA Makes Billions and the
Student Athlete Get None of It,” Greg Johnson said “All television revenue,
ticket and jersey sales, likeness promotions and other sources of income go to
the NCAA, the schools, the coaches, the event staffs and everyone else involved
in the business—except for the athletes creating the value. Last year, the NCAA
men’s basketball tournament generated $1.15 billion in television ads, well
beyond the revenue generated by the NFL and NBA playoffs, according to ESPN”
(Johnson 1).

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The
NCAA strongly believes paying players in scholarships is the right form of compensation
but, the truth is that this does not assist them in paying for out of school
expenses. The NCAA also believes paying students could hurt their
education. Student athletes being compensated for what they do should have no
negative effect on their education. On the contrary, I think it will push them
to be even more successful in the classroom because to obtain the salary,
athletes must remain academically eligible which requires persistence when it
comes to grades.

In
the article “Should College Student-Athletes Be Paid? Both Sides of the Debate”
Madisen Martinez writes, “Most profits from college
athletics do not go towards academics. Instead, they go to the coaches,
athletic directors, and some administrators, reports Edelman. Student-athletes do not need to receive huge salaries
like their coaches; rather, they could still be paid a reasonable amount
relative to how much the program makes. Scholarships often cover most of the
student-athletes’ books and room expenses, but even few extra hundred dollars
per year could compensate for the lack of time these students have to earn
spending money at a regular part-time job.” (Martinez).

In conclusion, scholarships are hugely
beneficial, but some student athletes get more than others. Ultimately, Cash or
a salary could be spent on other things that students need to live a regular
life. Scholarship money goes toward tuition and strictly fees for the
university. There are necessities and wants that student athletes should be
able to afford, but can’t because they are not being compensated for the work
and weekly hours they are putting in for their sport and do not have time to have
a part time job. With all the profit sports bring in for universities,
academically eligible student athletes should at least receive a minimum wage
salary for the work load they carry.

 

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