p.p1 textbook and supplement and adapt it to

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In **, ** attempts to answer a recurrent question amongst ELL teachers, including herself, and that is whether textbooks should or should not be used in an ESL classroom. 

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For Irujo, textbooks are necessary so long as they do not become the curriculum, the lesson plan itself or the only source of professional development for the teacher.

Using a textbook spares the teacher the necessity to design themselves the curriculum to be used, a tall order in and of itself notwithstanding the need to ensure its alignment with applicable governmental standards. However, using the textbook, with its exhaustive content, as curriculum, means that some lessons will go untaught due to time constraints or that they are addressed superficially due to the sheer extent of the content.

Using a textbook as a lesson plan can prevent the teacher, according to the author, from spending their already limited time “reinventing the wheel”. Nonetheless, textbooks also use the same format for all lessons which can easily cause boredom for the students, not to mention the absence of significant pedagogical content designed for anything other than the “typical” student in mind, foregoing students that require an adapted support for a myriad of reasons.

Using a textbook for professional development presumes that the textbook’s author is a creative and experienced pedagogical expert. Irujo argues that this presumption is not always correct and that, in any case, publishing editors often times play a significant role in the creation and design of content.

The author considers then that the proper question should be about the most efficient use of textbooks. She goes on to mention a number of suggestions made by members of the teaching online community.

Irujo finally concludes with recommending all teachers to used a textbook and supplement and adapt it to fit his/her students and their needs, a recommendation that she extends to teacher who wish to create all their material from scratch and are unable to as well as to those who use one textbook to fulfill all the purposes mentioned. 

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